Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Avocado Update: Slow Growth

This week is shaping up to be a week of indoor gardening projects! We had a few requests for an update on the progress of our avocado plants. It's been 4 full weeks since our last update and I'm happy to say the plants are still growing, but sad to say not very much...


We would have hoped to see much longer stems and maybe a few little leaves at this stage in the game, but realize these things take time and our area isn't likely the best temperament for these plants.

Last time we checked in, the roots were growing and beginning to form additional roots from their main root. We weren't sure whether or not to plant them in soil, leave them be or transfer over to larger glasses. You can see slow progress below:


We ended up transferring them to larger, wider wine tumblers to allow for more root growth. The roots have continued to grow and strengthen while the stems seam to have slowed way down — though they are getting thicker and tougher (more like a trunk).

Here's a comparison of the smaller and larger pits, which have pretty much caught up with one another at this point:


For now, we're keeping an eye on them and maintaining their water/sun supply daily. Quite possibly by the next update we may decide to transfer them over to potted containers to see if this helps. We've been hesitant thus far since we've read it's best to transfer once a few leaves have sprouted from the stem so we shall see!


All in all, this isn't the most exciting of updates, but we are happy at this point they seem to still be alive! In keeping with this week's indoor planting trend, we've got the beginnings of another project to share tomorrow!


P.S. We're thrilled to be named among many blogs nominated for the Apartment Therapy "Homies Awards" in the DIY blog category. Should you have the time to spare a vote, we'd love yours for 17 Apart! Click here to vote. While over there, be sure to check out the plethora of other awesome DIY focused blogs — it's a pretty amazing list. Thanks to all that voted for us already!

28 comments:

  1. I followed a different way, i put wrapped the seed in a wet paper towel, placed it in a baggy, sealed and then put it in a dark safe place. After it spouted roots and s sprout I planted it in a pot and now it is about a two foot tall sapling. You could probably pot the seeds as they are now. I you do I bet the sprout would take off.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I followed a different way, i put wrapped the seed in a wet paper towel, placed it in a baggy, sealed and then put it in a dark safe place. After it spouted roots and s sprout I planted it in a pot and now it is about a two foot tall sapling. You could probably pot the seeds as they are now. I you do I bet the sprout would take off.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Creative — I like the idea of the paper towel and bag to get the pit to sprout. When yours sprouted the stem, did it have leaves or did you plant in soil right away? Still debating!

      Delete
    2. I just put it in the dirt right from the beginning with just a little of the top showing and it sprouts. Just water it a little so it doesn't dry out.

      Delete
  3. You have inspired me with these posts to try some of this myself! Right now I have some scallions growing on my kitchen windowsill and I'm wondering what else I can grow.
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Becky that's awesome! We are learning you can grow SO much. We are currently trying onions, avocados, bok choy, and sweet potatoes in our own windowsill.

      Delete
  4. We have had pretty great results growing avocados right in the dirt. We discovered this by accident in our temporary compost area (which was basically just a pile of dirt on the far end of our yard where we would bury our kitchen scraps). It stays moist in this area, so it made for great germination conditions. We had a number of little avocado trees growing last year, that reached at least 7 inches tall and got all leafy. If the deer hadn't eaten them they would be pretty big by now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How awesome they sprung right up from the compost completely naturally!

      Delete
  5. It is my understanding that unless the plant is grafted to a producing tree it won't grow avocados. Mine is over 5 ft. Looks nice anyway!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great tip — we too have heard that unless grafting an avocado plant, not to expect the fruits to taste the same as the original did.

      We've heard it can take anywhere from 3-15 years if at all to product fruit on a tree grown from the pit, but they make pretty houseplants!

      Delete
  6. I've tried to produce an avocado plant the way you did (in water). I had done this many years ago and it worked GREAT! Now, they haven't been sprouting! :( I've tried SEVERAL times! I'm wondering what wrong with the pit! (i know it COULDN'T BE ME!!!! lol)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michelle,

      I wonder if the plants have changed over time — kind of like milk? Anyway - def give it another try, we'd love to hear if it works!

      Delete
    2. Its probably a gmo seed variety that has the suicide gene (aka cant reproduce)

      Either that or your water is much more poisonous than it used to be; i would try filtered water and an organic avacado to avoid those problems in the future.

      Also, ive heard budnip is why most things wont grow roots these days.. But i doubt they can spray it on an avacado and get it to the seed... Its more for root vegetables and pineapples... Which upsets me; ive been trying really hard to get these pineapples to grow... So hard to find a guaranteed organic pineapple in canada...

      Delete
  7. I think u have the water two high up on the pit. Drowning the stem. My avacado has spprouted but the pit didn't crack and peel like yours has. Just a thought

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! We had a little more luck down the road with some patience and the avocados are now growing to the point where we are experimenting with pinching them out to promote horizontal growth!

      Delete
  8. I just planted some Avocado this weekend. Thanks for the pointers! co2 boost

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michael thanks for checking in please keep us updated on your progress!

      Delete
  9. I put one in soil, halfways, kept watering and in about 2 month it finally showed the first leaf. after it is out, it will grow fast. mine is about 50-60 cm high now, its not growing with an extrem speed anymore but it keeps getting new leafs and is really pretty and looks healthy. Before this one I tried about 6 other in different ways (in water) and none of them did anything.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I have about a dozen avocado trees in various stages of growth. I just put them in the garden soil with about an inch of dirt over the top and they grow like crazy. I have one that is from last year and it is over six feet tall. Most of them grow three to four feet a year. I feed them the same fertilizer that I feed all my fruit trees and they seem to love it.....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wonderful! Curious if one of your trees has ever produced fruit? Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  11. i have growen several over the years by just placing half deep on side of house plant... make itsure is one taht you keep more moist...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great to hear we are hoping for success!

      Delete
  12. The easiest way to grow and avocado tree: I was in a place full of avocado trees. I planned on bringing home a seed to plant. I rinsed it and still wet I placed it in a transparent plastic bag three days before I left for the place where I live.
    When I arrived I did not take it out from the plastic bag but instead I rinsed it again and left it in the bag (without adding water to the bag, just wetting the seed). I continued wetting the seed every three or four days, always leaving it in the bag in my kitchen.
    In two weeks’ time I had the roots; then I planted it, covering it completely with soil, placed it in the shade and watered it almost daily. After 20 days more or less the plant came to the surface with a couple of small leaves. This was some time ago. Now I have around 15 avocado trees and two of them are two times my height.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh wow, what a great method — we will definitely have to try this at some point and compare the two!

      Delete
    2. do your trees produce avocados?

      Delete
    3. No we have heard it can take upwards of 13 years and even then it is not guaranteed to produce an avocado.

      Delete
  13. As I child I watched my father sprout an avocado in a glass like this. Once it was about 10-20 inches tall and had a good amount of leaves he planted it in our back garden. He babied that sapling through our mild socal winter and eventually it grew to a huge tree of about 30 feet tall. Never saw any fruit until the day many years later they topped the tree back to about 8 feet tall. They found one large avocado on the tree when they chopped it back. Never forgot the wonder of watching it sprout grow and become one of the biggest trees in our neighborhood.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to read and comment here in our corner of the world.

P.S. Any comments from the animal kingdom will be forwarded to Basil in a timely manner.